Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

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Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby PES Stats Database » 2008 Dec 13, 00:21

Nicknames: "Topo Gigio", "El Torero" (The bullfighter)

Club: Villarreal CF | Club Atlético Boca Juniors
(number 10)



Growth type: Early/Lasting

INFO:

Spoiler: show
I've written before (in the very first football entry on this blog) about the importance of the Number 10 shirt in Argentinian football and about Argentina's stupendous line of creative playmakers since Maradona. But Maradona is an impossible player to emulate. Arguably the greatest player in history, easily the greatest player of his generation, he could do everything that a creative player is required to. He could dribble like no player before or since, twisting and teasing, his low centre of gravity and amazing acceleration making him difficult to dispossess even illegally. He could run a game with one or two touch passing, sweeping the ball this way and that across the field, dragging defences out of shape with flicks and perfectly weighted long balls. He could shoot from distance, either delicately placing or blasting the ball wherever he wanted it. He obviously wasn't the greatest player in the air - altough he could still outjump Peter Shilton, a good six inches taller than him when it mattered - but he was usually the player supplying the crosses, not the player on the end of them. His true genius was in the combination of all these talents. On his game he was unplayable, no team could cope with him. In the 1986 World Cup Final, Germany detailed two players to mark him, hoping to copy the effect Berti Vogts had on Johann Crujiff in the 1974 Final. Lothar Matthaius, West Germany's best player, followed Maradona everywhere, and when the Argentine had possession Matthaius was joined by one of a revolving number of players in closing him down. For most of the game this worked, but Maradona only needed an instant to hurt an opponent. His pass had set off Valdano on the run that led to Argentina's second goal, and not long after, he embarked on one long run right through the centre of the German defence, evading tackles, which ended with him in mid-air having been kicked by two players at once. Then, with seven minutes remaining and the game tied at 2-2, Maradona, with three Germans in close attendance, found Burruchaga breaking free in the German half with a beautiful first-time volleyed pass. 3-2. Argentina were World Champions.

Most of the Argentinians who have been hailed as "the New Maradona" have excelled while running with the ball. It is this aspect of football, the "gambeta", as they call it, which most excites the Argentine football imagination. It is also what Maradona is best associated with, his goals against England and Belgium in the Quarters and Semis of the 1986 World Cup springing instantly to mind. Players like Saviola, D'Alessandro, Messi, Ortega, Tevez and Aimar have all been excellent dribblers, while Juan Sebastian Veron and Juan Roman Riquelme are more old-fashioned, passing playmakers. Riquelme in particular seems the last of a dying breed. He has no pace to speak of, and so would seem unsuited for the hustle and flying shrapnel of a modern midfield. Yet he never seems hurried and always seems to have time and space on the ball. He never panics. When he is man-marked, he finds enough space to hit devastating one touch passes, Maradona-style. His technique is beautiful, his control flawless, allowing him to caress the ball and make it do exactly what he wants, and so those passes, be they long or short, volleyed or slid along the grass, never seem to miss their intended targets.

Much of Riquelme's work goes almost unnoticed. He takes the ball and relays it accurately, often with the same touch. He moves with his head up and reads the game superbly. He is always moving into space, calling for the ball, moving it along and finding space yet again. This is not often flashy work, as the ball moves back and forth across midfield and his team probes for weakness. But it is Riquelme dictating the pace of that probing, Riquelme's eyes the keenest at identifying the weakness. Creating angles, pulling opposition players out of position, making space for his teammates. The game of the classic playmaker is all about angles around the penalty area, creating gaps in a defence through which to slip the ball. Riquelme is a master at this art. The second goal of Argentina's 6-0 routing of Serbia in the 2006 World Cup was the goal of the tournament, with 24 passes in a minute in the build-up, and its a typical example of Riquelme's subtle prompting. He plays a one-two with Saviola before the ball is passed across the face of the Serbian area to Cambiasso. His touch is a mere flick straight into Saviola's path with the outside of his right foot that instantly eliminates two Serbians from the play allowing the move to culminate in a beautiful goal :

That sort of touch is pure Riquelme : casual, perfect, with an almost sensual feel for the properties of a football. He is capable of dribbles and tricks as well, his ability to get himself out of tricky situations enabling him to maintain his teams possession of the ball, obviously an eternal priority :

His touch is so subtle and delicate that if you watch many clips of him in possession he barely touches the ball with his toes or with either instep or outstep, as most players do. His lack of pace is almost an advantage when it comes to controlling the ball - when faced with an approaching defender he knows he cannot knock the ball beyond them and then outsprint them to collect it. So he has to be clever and use trickery. He tends to drag and spin the ball beneath his studs, minutely inclining and angling his ankles to spin it in first one direction and then another. He is also extremely strong - he is 6ft - and can turn his back on a defender and hold the ball up seemingly indefinitely, losing little ground with twists and turns until he sees a runner he can pass to.

You would imagine that such a talent would be cherished by any footballing nation, but Riquelme is a controversial figure in Argentina. The Argentine style has always combined skillful individual dribbling with fast, short passing along the ground. The above goal against Serbia is perhaps the perfect example. Riquelme's critics contend that he slows the game down too much when in possession. He has been derogatorily called "the tollbooth" in reference to the appearance that everything stops when it comes to him. But this is to miss the point. Riquelme is always in control of that pace, skillful enough to slow things down when he needs to, but with the timing and technique to inject just the right amount of pace into the movement of the ball at the right moment. Jose Pekerman, coach of Argentina at the last World Cup and a big fan of Riquelme, has commented that in football, it is the ball that needs to move fast, not the player. He was the first National coach to give Riquelme a regular place in his starting line-up. Indeed, he built his team around the playmaker's talents, meaning that the likes of Veron and Ortega, still major figures in Domestic football, were dropped, and Aimar, Saviola, Tevez and Messi all rotated from the bench to supplementary positions in the teams offensive formation. He was rewarded by Riquelme by an utterly dominant performance against Brazil in a South American qualifier in Buenos Aires, topped off by this goal and the audacious volleyed pass with the sole of his boot that precedes it:

Argentina qualified for the World Cup ahead of Brazil. After a strong win against a powerful Ivory coast and the destruction of Serbia, they were favourites in the early stages. Riquelme was controlling games in the manner expected of him, but he seemed to tire as the tournament progressed and was not quite so influential in the first knock-out match against Mexico, though Argentina edged it with Maxi Rodriguez's wonderful goal. Against Germany, in a tight midfield battle, Riquelme was again crucial. Argentina were leading and dominant, Riquelme spraying passes around and the Germans unable to hold onto the ball when they could get it off the opposition. But Pekerman surrendered to his defensive instincts and substituted his Number 10. Moments later the Germans equalised and they, not an Argentina without its conductor, were the dominant team throughout extra-time, only to win on penalties. Pekerman resigned, Riquelme only lasting a single game as Captain before retiring from International football altogether, claiming that the criticism he had attracted in Argentina during the World Cup had made his mother sick.

He has had a tough time with the Argentine press ever since he left the country to move to Barcelona. He had been signed by Boca Juniors from Argentinos Juniors at the age of 17, and broke into the first team a year later. Here he became a central figure, Maradona's favourite player, and bearer of the heavy burden that is the Number 10 shirt. He wore it lightly at that time, helping Boca win the Argentine Championship three times between 1998 and 2001, winning the South American equivalent of the Champions League, the Copa Libertadores, in 2000, and the Intercontinental Cup (beating Real Madrid 2-1)in the same year. He was voted South American Footballer of the Year in 2001, putting him in the company of legends like Maradona, Zico, Pele, Socrates, Enzo Francescoli, Carlos Valderama and Romario. In 2002 he became involved in a contract dispute with Boca and was eventually transferred to Barcelona. He already had a reputation as a quiet player, singular in his needs in training, and unable to perform to the best of his abilities unless he had a midfield "minder" to do his dirty work. At Barcelona, coach Louis van Gaal made it clear to his new player that he did not actually want him, that he was a "political" signing, and promptly deployed him on the wing, utterly wasting his talents. To compound these problems, his brother was kidnapped and held for ransom in Buenos Aires only a few weeks after he left Argentina. Riquelme negotiated with the kidnappers and eventually paid the ransom money. But unsurprisingly he played fitfully after his first few months in Spain, until Barca eventually sent him on loan to Villareal in 2003.

Villareal are a small club in a small town, and their Chilean coach, Manuel Pelligrini, based his playing style on South American football, recruiting a backbone of talent from that continent. Brazil-born midfielder Marcus Senna won the ball and did the running for Riquelme, while Uruguayan Diego Forlan gave him a yellow shirt to aim for with his through-balls. At the back, Argentine captain Juan Pablo Sorin commanded the left wing, and there were three other Argentines, an Ecuadorean, a Bolivian and a Mexican in the squad that reached the Semi-finals of the Champions League in 2006. That Champions League run was due to the disciplined, fast-passing game Villareal played, and Riquelme was utterly cruical to that. Diego Forlan won the European Golden Boot in 2005 with 25 League goals, a good proportion of them coming from Riquelme assists. He was the same player he had been at Boca, and the name on his shirt read "Roman" instead of Riquelme to signal the psychological break from the events at Barcelona. He was nominated for the FIFA World Player of the Year award the same year and came second only to Ronaldinho in year-end polls amongst Spanish football writers. But it all went wrong for him in 2006. That World Cup exit and his subsequent International retirement, at the age of 29. His penalty miss against Arsenal in the Semi-final of the Champions League, which resurrected old Argentinian criticisms of his lack of mental toughness. And in recent months he has fallen out with Pelligrini and been left out of the Villareal squad which is not performing to anything like its levels of 12 months ago in his absence. The club signed Chilean wonderkid (and Winner of this years South American Player of the Year Award) Mattias Fernandez from Colo Colo around the same time Riquelme and Pelligrini's problem came to light. Fernandez is a more modern style of playmaker, and he has gone straight into the team, playing in Riquelme's position, but without much success so far. It takes a while for a South American to acclimatise to European football, as Riquelme would testify.

So Riquelme spent much of the transfer window looking for a move away from the club he drove to unprecedented success. Bayern Munich, Man Utd and Inter Milan were all rumoured to be interested, but nothing came off and at the time of writing he remains a Villareal player, though one who is not playing. For me, he is one of the top 5 players in World Football, and the fact that he is essentially without a club at the moment is one of those instances of insanity football throws up from time to time. This compilation ends with a few minutes worth of his performance against England in last years friendly in Geneva. I remember reading after that game the English players testimonies about how elusive and superb he had been. Watching the match, the first half had seemed almost a private duel between Riquelme and Wayne Rooney, each daring the other onto the next piece of intuitive genius, until Riquelme pulled away from Rooney, the younger man's relative inexperience showing as Riquelme dictated the course of the game and repeatedly made John Terry look like an idiot. Pekerman substitued him with only a few minutes left and Argentina 2-1 ahead. In his absence, and granted some possession of the ball, England scored two late goals and won the game. Of Course Pekerman repeated the mistake in the World Cup....


VIDEOS:

Spoiler: show



Caps
Spoiler: show
Argentina: 69 appearances / 17 goals

Club
_arg 1996-2002 Boca Juniors 150 appearances / 48 goals
_esp 2002-2003 F.C. Barcelona 30 appearances / 3 goals
_esp 2003-2007 Villarreal C.F. 121 appearances / 37 goals
_arg 2007- Boca Juniors 74 appearances / 13 goals

Trophies & Tournaments:
_arg 1997 FIFA U-20 World Cup - Argentina
_arg 1998 Apertura Primera División Argentina - Boca Juniors
_arg 1999 Clausura Primera División Argentina - Boca Juniors
_arg 2000 Copa Libertadores - Boca Juniors
_arg 2000 Apertura Primera División Argentina - Boca Juniors
_arg 2001 Copa Libertadores - Boca Juniors
_arg 2001 Intercontinental Cup - Boca Juniors
_esp 2004 UEFA Intertoto Cup - Villarreal C.F.
_arg 2007 Copa Libertadores - Boca Juniors
_arg 2007 Intercontinental Cup - Boca Juniors
_arg 2008 Apertura Primera División Argentina - Boca Juniors
_arg 2008 Gold medal Olympics Game - Argentina
_arg 2008 Recopa Sudamericana - Boca Juniors
* South American Footballer of the Year: 2001
* Copa Libertadores Most Valuable Player: 2007
* Player of the Year of Argentina: 2000, 2001, 2008
* Don Balón Award for Foreign Player of the Year in La Liga: 2005
* Silver Ball 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup


ADDITIONAL LINKS:

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_Rom%C3%A1n_Riquelme

http://www.footymania.com/player.phtml?playerID=2194

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_Rom%C3%A1n_Riquelme

************************************************************************

Club: Club Atlético Boca Juniors



Growth type: Early/Lasting

VIDEOS:

Spoiler: show



* * * * * * * * * *

Club: Club Atlético Boca Juniors



Growth type: Early/Lasting

VIDEOS:

Spoiler: show

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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby Jon Osterman » 2016 Oct 29, 01:28

I have some doubts over his ATT numbers, and i would appreciate if someone elucidate me: besides his majestics technical numbers, his attack number on those sets are lower than other legendary AM, such as Zidane. In my mind Riquelme had a tactical mind superior than Zizou, with greater eye for incisive, killer passes. His passing numbers allow him to make those incisive passes, but he will take such actions precisely, do the right moves? Or the number refer more about his danger in a far more subjective way? I was checking his and Zidane's goalscoring numbers and they are very much alike, in certain cases the argentine surpasses Zinedine... i don't know if it's a way to replicate his "ball holding" style, making him "slower" to pass the ball, or something. If i am missing a point, i would like to be aware of it.
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby Fantasista » 2016 Oct 29, 10:31

A discussion from aprox 2 years ago (page 8) when he was rated at 86 att. Dunno why he was downgraded even further...

Spoiler: show
Fantasista wrote:
Roy wrote:I've watched quite a few matches from this era and I think his ATT is well rated at 86.

Considering the amount of work put into creating this set he most probably is but that still isn't an explanation. Not to mentioned he had 89att if I recall correctly and silently downgraded afterwards. Gonna repeat it again it's most likely the best value but I'd like to know why. Just comparing him to prime xavi who's 2pts above Riqi I gotta say Riquelme was much more direct and offensively inclined player, not focusing so much on building up play but rather finishing actions, shots, passes that lead to goals...
Roy wrote:And because he's the best playmaker ever

One of the best
Roy wrote:doesn't mean he should be over every other playmaker in terms of ATT purely because of that.

Totally agree here


jurgens wrote:
Eh, not really. I mean, yes and no. Riquelme was direct with passing, but then again he wasn't. I mean he isn't a slow build up player like Xavi, he was much more incisive, did look to play final balls alot more than him. But at the end of the day, he still was very much so a dictator of the play, the tempo of the match. He was the one who was focused on distribution and while he defintly had the dangerous passing aspect to his game, the safety passes were also a massive part. But outside of his killer passes, he really wasn't that much of a direct threat. His shooting was only his other real offensive threat. And he mostly played like... he'll get the ball, and shield, won't dribble much forward with it.. it's a defensive/distraccting sort of style. And that was a huge, huge part of his game, really not a very dangerous or direct means of attacking though. And he was like this very often. And which compare all of this with players like Laudrup/iniesta/silva even mata today... they just have a much more direct and dynamic means of attacking. Riquelme would get the ball and distribute, or get the ball and fuck around on it, dribbling to maintain possession, but rarely to create danger. And like I said, his shooting is like his only other means of creating danger and if he wasn't playing final balls... where is the danger coming from? I know you can't expect a player to play through balls every second, but for other players who don't, they kind of make up for it in other ways. But then again, they don't have the playmaking or distribution skills of riquelme. Just differnt styles. So there is a lot of riquelme being on the ball that isn't so dangerous. He doesn't really have a third dimension to his attack that makes him unplayable. And for his vision/shooting alone, I think with his passing stats is enough to show that... yeah hes a huge threat offensively with his passing and shooting... but other than that hes just not unstoppable, you know? Also, I know hes at similar levels attack wise to players like silva/iniesta/mata who probably have more attacking aspects to their game, and more dangerous aspects overall, but I feel that one aspect of Riquelmes attacking play is so strong, that he should have a similar attack value, rather than a lesser regardless if he falls short in some areas, because he excels in passing just too much.

Hope I'm explaining this well enough.

(..)

edit: just wanna add when I look at a true 90's player... and someone I consider that, cassano... just can't see Riquelme at a similar number. The backbone of the game is just too differnt, riquelme has to dictacte play, cassano doesn't... so cassano is trying to create danger at every chance he gets. And while cassano is mostly limited to passing and shooting like riquelme, cassano is just too dangerous in comparison. He has his bad games and moments, but overall... his passing is just insanely agressive and on top of that hes just a genius, hes just too much to handle. Can't really say the same for riquelme, the style riquelme has is more reserved, less direct.
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby Maracanazo » 2016 Oct 31, 14:35

i'm try to add him to my classic Argentine, but i'm confused.

what is his best era? the young mode or the old man?
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby Fantasista » 2016 Oct 31, 15:44

Maracanazo wrote:what is his best era? the young mode or the old man?


The middle-mode man.
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby chamakh » 2016 Oct 31, 19:36

Maracanazo wrote:what is his best era? the young mode or the old man?

His 2007-2008 era was just out of this world, one of the best player in the world imo. He won Copa Libertadores 2007 almost single-handedly.
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby Paablito » 2016 Nov 01, 01:46

chamakh wrote:
Maracanazo wrote:what is his best era? the young mode or the old man?

His 2007-2008 era was just out of this world, one of the best player in the world imo. He won Copa Libertadores 2007 almost single-handedly.

hell yeah, he was absolutely brilliant in every aspect of his game, i didnt see a player so good in my whole life. Wasnt one of the best player in that era, he was definitely one of the best player in the world by far from the 2000 to 2012 (more than a decade), his level in 2007-08 just were flawless, even in 09/10 was crazy but had a lot of injuries he didnt help him to be more regular. His touches, his vision, his passes (!!!), his fk, his knowledge of football, damn when I watch him, makes me cry... He is the last n° 10 in the world and is our, he really deserves much more credit for himself, i fucking love him.
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby jurgens » 2016 Nov 01, 04:09

He was the best in the world in 2007, just because hes in argentina he doesn't get the credit, no one was close to that level.
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby Moysís » 2016 Nov 01, 10:30

Ehh Román... the last mohican on the football fields.. never again such a player and talent in modern era of football.. true and sad..
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby Paablito » 2016 Dec 14, 13:30

One of his best assist ever and one of the best he could imagine


ps: dont know if somebody posted before, sorry
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby lucashag » 2017 Jan 01, 23:57

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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby reydecopas » 2017 Jan 03, 18:46

Yesterday I watched again the full match of the Intercontinental 2000, Riquelme was outstanding made Real Madrid defenders went crazy, Something to keep an eye on could be his BB, that match is a perfect example of Body Battles with strong players in that regard (Makelele, Hierro, Njitap) In my eyes he looks like 86-88
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby Vickingo » 2017 Feb 01, 17:33



He was in the wrong time at Barca, such a genius. So strange see Saviola, Sorín and him playing together at Barca.
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby Vickingo » 2017 Mar 15, 16:12

reydecopas wrote:Yesterday I watched again the full match of the Intercontinental 2000, Riquelme was outstanding made Real Madrid defenders went crazy, Something to keep an eye on could be his BB, that match is a perfect example of Body Battles with strong players in that regard (Makelele, Hierro, Njitap) In my eyes he looks like 86-88


Indeed.

Well, I was watching all the vs I could find from his first era, which is the most I'm related with aside his late years. And man, he was so damn good at everything, I mean, imo yeah he was a little different but as we all know he was a genius back then like he was after and thorought his carreer. Since his first match you realized he was that kind of player, unique at his movement, intelligence and mainly his mature brain having like 20 years old.

I have a problem in this...whenever I watch his matches I can see the same virtues than his prime and my problem is: are we underrating his "prime" (Villareal-2007 Boca's) or he does need similar numbers at his early days. Copa America 1999, 1998's afa tournament, Intercontinental 2000, U-20 1997 in Malasya, Libertadores 2000, Libertadores 2001, Intercontinental 2001, Clausura 2002...his level was just sick in most of them and picking matches randomly you can watch the same: a fucking genius on and off the ball.

But let's go to what I've got (I could be wrong because even watching a lot of matches and vs vids and knowing him since I have memories it's really hard to get numbers):

BB: Yeah his Body balance was just in there...i was positive to give him oranges at his prime but as I'm not that related with aside Copa Libertadores 2007 and Copa America 2007 I can't tell 100%...still at his early days he was quite similar even having less mass muscle and being a little more agiler...smth like 86-87 could work.

Stamina: no way he does need 85 but for sure he could get 80...he was much more active in my eyes, always looking for the ball and moving all around, not too much to explain, he always did that but at his early days it was more visible his off the ball movement.

Agility: He had more fluid movements than before for sure, he was thinner and used to change a lot the direction of his movements with the ball...nothing great but at least low greens could have.

Speed: I can't really say a number, he was faster than after for sure but he didn't use it that much aside the moments he passed the ball and went looking for a space to get it again. I'm more impressed about his DS in counter attacks. Still I don't think 79-81-84 are good numbers, even his ts was better than his acc in my eyes as always.

Dribble Accuracy: He was much more a dribbler back then and his step on skills movement was just too much for anyone (ask for it to Geremi and Makelele :lol:) I'd raise it a point just to make a difference of he was capable of.

Technique: can't see Riquelme under reds in any era, his touch was just out of this world.

EDIT: Oh and I forgot his long passing, I was more impressed by them than for his spa (which was insane as well) but I feel that 83 in lps is just absolutely wrong, it must be at least low oranges. I feel julgui gave him 93 in spa just because of he was young and to make him less dangerous, same with his lpa.
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby chamakh » 2017 Mar 18, 03:18

Hey Vic, there's something i've always wanted to ask. Why did Riquelme always has been rated with low mentality? Because in real life it was perhaps one of his greatest strengths. He was one of the very few player i've seen which would play without fearing in adverse situations or key matches because in fact these kind of games were their favorite ones. The way he handled the pressure makes me think about how strong was his mind those days.
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby Vickingo » 2017 Mar 20, 12:18

chamakh wrote:Hey Vic, there's something i've always wanted to ask. Why did Riquelme always has been rated with low mentality? Because in real life it was perhaps one of his greatest strengths. He was one of the very few player i've seen which would play without fearing in adverse situations or key matches because in fact these kind of games were their favorite ones. The way he handled the pressure makes me think about how strong was his mind those days.


Well Konami always rated him low and it's basically right cause he was always lazy and when he used to get tired he just stop running that much and start to cover the ball here and there and pass the ball...it's pretty visible in any Román match when he was out of energies. I made one (vs) game against River in 2011 in La Bombonera where this is clear, he even quited off his protections lol. That's why I'm pushing for giving him yellow stamina in first era, he was clearly way better at movement and ran a lot more than later at his career, he changed a lot when he went to Villareal though, it's like he started playing old playmaker at his 25/27 years.

Here you have
Spoiler: show


Well I bumped the topic two or three times and nobody gave a damn about my suggestions :lol: so I'm gonna update it later with what I've got. Any suggestion/change is more than welcome as I'm not 100% sure in some numbers.
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby Fixer » 2017 Mar 20, 12:40

Riquelme played well in those matches because he's one of the best players ever. It's not like low mentality is going to make him become garbage vs big teams or anything, he's got the best stats in the database for a Classic Nº10.
kunmariano wrote:
Ajacied_Breda1 wrote:Why don't you just bugger off for a bit, kunmariano. I've got better things to do then read your biased tripe.

ey friend learns to write, DO NOT UNDERSTAND ANYTHING YOU !!!!... who believes you got a problem here?

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Vickingo
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby Vickingo » 2017 Mar 20, 23:11

Well updated the first era.

If you want someday explain what it is waste time in a legal form and cover the ball in god mode against great players, please show him this: https://youtu.be/qtd7J7CzfOc?t=427
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Re: Juan Román Riquelme | 1998-2001 | 2005-2008 | 2011-2012

Postby lucashag » 2017 Apr 06, 22:52

this is my absolute favourite game of román ever, he absolutely schooled palmeiras all game




Where ya going pal?

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